Emmylou Harris Covers Steve Earle’s “The Pilgrim”

Emmylou Harris recently appeared on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert with her band The Red Dirt Boys and gave a moving performance of Steve Earle’s “The Pilgrim.” The song is my favorite from Earle’s bluegrass album The Mountain (1999), so it was great to hear Harris’s wonderful voice giving it a new interpretation and a new meaning.

In introducing the song, Harris touched upon today’s political culture and the plight of refugees. She noted, “This song is for the over 65 million displaced persons around the world.”

And then she began the song.

I am just a pilgrim on this road, boys;
This ain’t never been my home.
Sometimes the road was rocky long the way, boys;
But I was never travelin’ alone.

Check it out.

Harris and The Red Dirt Boys are touring to celebrate the 25th anniversary of her classic album Emmylou Harris and the Nash Ramblers At The Ryman, which was recently re-issued.

What is your favorite cover of a Steve Earle song? Leave your two cents in the comments.

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    Troubled Waters Plays “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard”

    With the departures of David Letterman and Craig Ferguson from late-night television, the odds of catching an intelligent discussion on a late-night talk show decreased significantly. That is one reason why it was refreshing to see Stephen Colbert finally take over for Letterman, and his first week did not disappoint, with highlights that included a thoughtful conversation about grief and loss with Vice President Joe Biden.

    Of course, we want to laugh and dance too. And the first week of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert did not disappoint in that category either.

    For example, at the beginning of one episode the announcer (Colbert) exclaimed that one of the guests would be Troubled Waters, a Paul Simon tribute band. For those who stayed awake for the end, the “tribute band” did not disappoint, turning out to be made up of Paul Simon. Troubled Waters then performed “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard” from Simon’s 1972 self-titled album.

    On the performance of “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard,” Simon also received a little help from Colbert, who proved he not only can be thoughtful, he can sing, dance, and whistle. Check it out.

    What do you think of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert so far? Leave your two cents in the comments.

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    Goodbye to Stephen Colbert and Craig Ferguson

    Josh Robert Thompson and Craig Ferguson
    It has been a bad week for innovative television, with Stephen Colbert’s The Colbert Report ending Thursday and The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson ending Friday. Of course, we have not seen the last of these men. Although Colbert will leave behind his Colbert Report persona, he will be taking over for David Letterman. And we can only hope that we will be seeing more of Craig Ferguson, who for now continues to host the weekly syndicated game show, Celebrity Name Game, and to do a stand-up tour.

    I have felt a special pop-culture bond with Colbert for some time. About a year before he began his run on The Colbert Report, I went with a friend to a taping of The Daily Show. At first, the audience was disappointed to learn that Jon Stewart was taking a rare night off, but Stephen Colbert filled in for Stewart well, foreshadowing that he would one day have his own show. At one point during a commercial break, Colbert was goofing around and leaned against his desk with his arms in the air playing to the studio audience, “I’m Ultraman!” Nobody laughed but me, and he nodded at me saying, “We’re the only ones who know who Ultraman is?” as I nodded back. As a kid, inspired by the Japanese television series on my Midwestern black and white TV, I used to pretend I was Ultraman as I played in my backyard. In the New York City studio, though, I found joy in discovering a connection so far away from my childhood home.

    This week, Colbert ended The Colbert Report with an over-the-top final episode. It was funny and illustrated his numerous big-name connections. Check out the farewell of “We’ll Meet Again” with numerous celebrity cameos, starting at around the 1:10 mark in the video below (although Colbert actually ended the show with another song, “Holland, 1945” by Neutral Milk Hotel, playing over the final credits, apparently in a nod to his family).

    Craig Ferguson’s final week on his show, which also began in 2005, has been relatively relaxed, hip, and low-key, consistent with his approach in the late-night spot. Still, he gave us several treats this week, such as an introduction to Josh Robert Thompson, the man behind the remotely controlled skeleton Geoff Peterson (see video at end of post).

    Whereas The Colbert Report seemed so much a product of our time with its satire of cable TV politics, Ferguson’s show has always been simultaneously cutting toward the future and the past. Kids liked him, but so did my mom. Ferguson’s rejection of late-night norms has been innovative, even as his show with a talking skeleton sidekick and other outrageous antics nodded to a past of Ernie Kovacs, Sid Caesar, and Imogene Coca.

    Ferguson was refreshing for the way he seemed less connected to our modern celebrity-driven media, even while interviewing celebrities. Like Colbert, his final episode also featured a song with celebrity cameos, using the quirky choice of “Bang Your Drum,” a song about carving your own path by Scottish band Dead Man Fall (see video above, which begins as a music video and ends with Ferguson performing with a band and choir).

    Like a real late-night conversation in your home or dorm, Ferguson’s interviews with a guest could easily slip into an insightful discussion of famous painters or philosophers while still being funny. His monologues could touch on honest personal experiences as his did when he famously discussed his own alcoholism. In one of his great interviews, Dr. Cornel West told Ferguson, “You have a spirituality in your honesty.” So, it does not surprise me to hear that Ferguson recently explained how a conversation with Desmond Tutu affected the way he is leaving The Late Late Show.

    We live in a crazy time where computer hackers can undermine a movie and where a former vice president gets air time to defend the practice of torture, so we desperately need the satirists like Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart. I will miss The Colbert Report, even as I play my DVD of the show’s Christmas special.

    But I will miss Ferguson’s nightly show even more. Most nights, I could not stay up late enough to watch The Late Late Show, so I actually saw Ferguson less often than the earlier Colbert Report. But on nights when I could not sleep, because of a thunderstorm, loneliness, anger, despair, overwork, or too much caffeine, I found comfort in Ferguson’s honesty and goofiness, providing us something real and direct while our troubles kept us awake.

    Leave your two cents in the comments.

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    Stephen Colbert Announces Final Date for “The Colbert Report”

    This week on The Colbert Report, Stephen Colbert announced that his final episode of The Colbert Report will be December 18, 2014. During the episode, he snuck in the information while promoting the new paperback version of his book, America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t.

    Of course, fans will still get to see Stephen Colbert when he takes over for David Letterman. But there will be no more “Colbert” the character, at least not on a regular basis. Check out the announcement below.

    Regarding Colbert’s new gig, David Letterman has yet to announce his final day on Late Show With David Letterman. So, we will have to wait for the announcement of when we will get to see Colbert nightly again.

    Will you miss The Colbert Report? Leave your two cents in the comments.

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    How Lucky, John Prine on “The Colbert Report”

    Last night, singer-songwriter John Prine appeared on The Colbert Report, where he talked about his former career as a mailman, hence the name of his latest release from the archives, The Singing Mailman Delivers. Check out the short interview.Prine then performed “How Lucky” from his album Pink Cadillac (1979). Colbert also announced that one of Prine’s great albums The Missing Years (1991) will be released on vinyl for the first time. That is great news for vinyl collectors. I have had the wonderful CD since it came out and listen to it often.

    Also, as a web exclusive, Prine performed “Paradise,” a song about Kentucky coal mining from his self-titled debut album, with a little help from Stephen Colbert. [February 2014 Update: Unfortunately, Prine’s performances on The Colbert Show are no longer available online. So below is another performance of “Paradise” from 2010, introduced by country singer Marty Stuart.]

    What is your favorite John Prine song? Leave your two cents in the comments.

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